Archive for the ‘Terwilligar’ Tag

Explorer in my Own City   1 comment

Like a Foreign Land

The excitement of exploration – even in my own city. I love to just explore, to take new paths and see what I can see. It is a particular bonus when I can discover a new cycling route, one that will become part of my regular routes by virtue of it’s good qualities: low traffic, smooth surface and interesting scenery. I felt like an explorer of times of old, looking for a new passage to the Orient. For the last couple of years I have hoped to discover  route from the west side of the Anthony Henday Drive bridge [map]. I’ve crossed the bridge and rode up into and around the Cameron Heights neighborhood, a number of times but never found  that elusive connector route. I always had to turn around, cross the bridge again and return my ride on the south side of the river.

I approached the bridge again this day and was taken by the construction of another,  new high voltage power line along the existing utility corridor. It wasn’t my goal but it did provide a surreal view (see photo above)

Construction

Wooden Road

I’ll start this tale from when I reached the Terwilligar area since I have already described my route getting there a few times .  there is a bike opath that leads down to the Anthony Henday Drive over the North Saskatchewan River in southwest Edmonton. I have crossed this bridge a few times in years past, always hoping to find a route that goes somewhere but to no avail.  I’ve ridden the path until it dumps me out in a residential neighborhood, ridden around that neighborhood not finiding anywhere to go and then simply backtracking.

This day however I pulled out my iPhone and looked at my mapping application. I noticed what looked like a path that I’d not noticed before just a block away. I rode over there, discovered a little concrete sidewalk goinf away from the road and following that a short ways it connected to an old road that lead into a ravine!

An old road through a ravine

Downstream: The Tiny Creek

On the left of this picture you can see a wooden fence, Below that fence a culvert provides a path for the tiny stream under the road. At this point one could hop across the creek but what a difference looking upstream.

Looking upstream I saw the most marvelous beaver dam and not only a big dam but a huge pond with the beaver’s den  in the middle. I was even fortunate enough to see the beaver swimming around in the pond. What  a fantastic discovery! I wasn’t expecting to see something like that so close to the heavy construction, freeway and residential neighborhood that I had just passed through.

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Upstream: The beaver dam, pond and den (and the beaver swimming too).

After a good break to observe and photograph  this marvel, I continued on up the road to the top of the ravine on the other side. From here I rejoined residential neighborhoods and roads. Although I did not explore  and further I was very excited because from that point I think I will be able to find a route, back along the north side of the river to the pedestrian bridge by Ft. Edmonton Park. If I can do that I will have a very nice cycling loop – but I left that exploration for another day and just retraced my route for this day.

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Downtown to Terwilligar (testing the trails)   Leave a comment

Today (2011 April 25) marked my longest right of the year. I ventured on one of my favorite routes, a 40K out and back from Downtown to Terwilligar. This was my first ride on most of these trails and roads this year so I’ll share what I encountered.

The bicycle paths on the northside of the river from Riverdale, through Rossdale and down River Road were great – dry and clean (except for a few wet patches in Rossdale, at the southeast corner.

The first hazard encountered was a lot of sand on the path connecting the River Road trail to the northeast end of Groat Bridge. this is a steep little section and sand is not welcome either going up or coming down. It’s not bad if you are the only one on this section but if  there is traffic, be prepared.

North Saskatchewan River looking east from Groat Bridge

The view from the bridge was quite dramatic as I crossed, with many chunks of ice floating downstream (on my return crossing the river was pretty much clear)

Once across the river and up the hill, I turned onto Emily Murphy Park Road to take the overpass over Groat Road. Very sandy! Sand would be a serious issue all of the way up Groat Road – on the road leading up to Hawrelak Park entrance and then on the sidewalk/path running on the west side of Groat Road.  Caution is in order when on the road and especially when changing lanes. The sidewalk is very sandy on the road side  put clear on the park side – again not an issue if  pedestrian/cycle traffic is light.

Sandy path between Hawrelak Park and Groat Road

The path from the traffic circle to the top of Keillor Road was pretty smooth cycling – clean and dry for the most part.

The Keillor Road hill was wet, and sandy. On is not going to want to cruise down like you would on dry summer pavement. Part of the bike path were still covered by snow and there was lots of run-off on the paths.

Snow, Sand and Water on Keillor Road Hill

Once down on the flat section beside the Whitemud Equine Center the road was pretty fast although there was snow on the road sides and there were wet sections. Back on the bike paths around the little bridge over the Whitemud Creek I again found a lot of sand – slow and cautious riding called for.

looking west down Keillor Road

Blocked Path at Quesnel Bridge

The next hazard was at the Quesnel Bridge construction site. The bike path is inconveniently blocked by construction trailers right where the trail intersects the road under the south end of the bridge. Cyclists must go off-road and ease their way down the square curb.

Once under the Quesnel I connect to the bike path running back behind Fort Edmonton Park. on the south bank of the river valley. I should know better than to expect a dry trail  on this side of the river before mid-May. True enough, this section was mostly wet and very sandy – that mix that drives me crazy with the crunching once it gets into my drive train. The good thing is that it was only water, there was no snow or ice that I had to cross along this path.

Beautiful but wet path to the south of Ft. Edmonton Park

From the end of this bike path I took the Whitemud Road – up the steep, gravelly hill. The hill was rough as usual but not overly muddy, so I didn’t really think about it.  I continued along Whitemud Road through the residential community.

Awkward Off-road Connection

There is one little off road connection that I usually take  between Riddell Street and Romaniuk Road  but today it was wet and muddy and I had to make a detour on to the nearest road. I continued for a few kilometers south of Rabbit Hill Road along  relatively dry but sandy residential roads before backtracking my route to get home.

Overall the ride was a success (my longest of the year, the weather was decent and my camera worked out well ) but I think I will not venture out on this same route again for a couple more weeks (hopefully by then  the paths will be dry and the sand will be swept up).

Fort Edmonton Footbridge over the North Saskatchewan River (viewed from Ramsey Crescent)